Monthly Archives: March 2014

Why and How to Keep your Resume Current and Professional Part 2

Why and How to Keep your Resume Current and Professional Part 2 
By Julie Adamen
[email protected]Julie Adamen

We know we do a lot as managers, but how to explain it on a resume without it being a litany of rote tasks (“take minutes” “perform walk-throughs”)?  Quantify your responsibilities in real terms to a prospective employer or supervisor by focusing more on the big things and less on the weeds. A well-executed resume for community managers should include these “big” items: Continue reading

Board Member, Manager, or Hero?

SuperheroThe “Hero Handbook” starts with the simple reminder of the purpose and goal as a Board Member:

  • Improve communications

  • Facilitate your association’s business, effectively and efficiently

  • Reduce stress in managing your association

Let’s face it. You became a Board Member to make things better. You want to improve communications, maximize amenities, improve and/or add new services, reduce expenses, fix the parking problems, help sell vacant properties…and on and on and on! Your heart is in the right place for sure. Then REALITY STRIKES. You need help. The job is bigger than you.  You quickly realize what most successful businesses have known for quite some time; technology must be your friend! You need to spearhead the charge to connect your community, to find a way to promote real-time communications with residents, to efficiently solve everyday community problems that never go away, to become a Board Member “Hero”.

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Why and How to Keep your Resume Current and Professional Part 1

Why and How to Keep your Resume Current and Professional Part 1 Julie Adamen
By Julie Adamen
[email protected]
If you are looking for employment, you obviously need a current, professional resume. But even if you aren’t actively seeking a job,  it’s always good to have one handy because you never know when opportunity is going to knock  and it could even be even from within your own firm (never assume your boss knows what you really do). So, dust off the one you have laying around, take a good, hard look at it and read on for some tips. Where can you improve?

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